Archery And Bowhunting Blog

10 Things You Must Pack for an Archery Tournament

If you are first starting out, you have probably wondered what your first archery tournament experience will be like. “Will I do well? Will the hotel serve breakfast? Have I practiced enough?”  Sure, these are fine questions to ask one’s self when wanting to attend an event. However, the real task to start thinking about is, “what do I pack?!” I will let you in on 10 key items to have packed for any tournament. Now we all know you will pack your bow and arrows. This list will give you the most neglected items that archers forget to bring with them to tournaments.

 

1/ Serving material: Many top archers will always have serving material on hand just in case a scenario happens that a D-loop breaks or nockpoint breaks. You don’t want to have to rely on someone else to have material for you. Especially if you’re walking around a 3D range, or a field course.

2/ Arrow Lube: This is your new best friend when you have a hard time pulling arrows out of any bale. Whether it is a 3D animal, Whitetail foam, or straw. This product will help in saving energy and time at the target.

3/ Binoculars/spotting scope: Never leave home without your trusty pair of arrow spotting glass. There is nothing worse than half way through your drive, or flight, that you instantly remember your pair is sitting on the coffee table back at home.

4/ Bow stand/bow pod: If you thought carrying your bow from target to target was tough, try walking around a field course that doesn’t have a bow stand available. Don’t make the event less fun for forgetting this important item.

5/ Extra spinwings/vanes: It happens all too often when yours and competitor’s arrows clash in the target. Ripping and cutting apart your fletching job. This could also be a problem when too many of your arrows need to be fixed and you don’t have anything for it. So always make sure to pack these and the fletching jig (or double sided tape) to apply them.

6/ Allen wrenches: The life blood of all bows are held together with parts to be tightened by a set of allen wrenches. Listen to your bow. If something starts rattling, get out your wrenches!

7/ Back-up release aid/finger tab: whether you are a compound or recurve archer, the way you shoot your bow comes down to these two products. If you happen to lose your primary or misplace it at the tournament and don’t have a back-up, you could be in some serious trouble.

8/ Weather gear: This ranges from rain and sun, cold and warm weather, and everything in between. Sunscreen and bug spray are your best friend for outdoors. As well as sunglasses and that favorite hat you always shoot in. If it decides to rain, make sure you have a jacket that you can shoot in. Your equipment wants to stay dry too, so make sure to either borrow a towel from the hotel or bring one with you that can wipe the rain off of your grip and other essential parts before you go to shoot that first arrow. Baby powder is also a secret weapon. Just a little sprinkle of the stuff on your palms can keep all that sweat and nervousness to a minimum on the most humid of days.

9/ Extra stabilizer weights: For some that don’t know the benefit of having just one to three extra stabilizer weights, here’s the scoop. Some people will tell you that they were holding really well the few days leading up to the tournament, and now that they are competing, they can’t seem to make it hold the same. If you get this same feeling the first day of the competition, you can either add (or remove) from your main stabilizer depending on if you bob up or down. Add to the main rod if your sight dot is drifting up, or remove one from the main rod if you are dipping down. Remember though, it won’t take much but those few extra weights could mean the difference on aiming if you need them.

10/ Snacks: Never forget to bring that favorite bar you like, or trail mix you can’t get enough of. Sometimes while walking courses or during target events, they don’t offer food on site. So you can quickly run low on blood sugar without realizing it. Don’t let it happen to you.

 

If you are looking for a case where you can fit all these and more, you need to check Legend Double2 compound bow case. It has enough space for 2 bows ATA up to 44" and lots of pockets for your gear.

 

 

Preparing for Archery Tournaments: Never Leave Home Without These 7 Things

Archery tournaments are fun, challenging, and exciting. They give you the chance to see old friends and make new ones, while shooting your bow. But they can become downright stressful if you forget important items that should have been on your packing list. The archers who have the most fun at tournaments are the ones who have practiced and are well-prepared for anything that might come up unexpectedly. A major part of being well-prepared is packing for the tournament list, and remembering these 10 items is a great start. 
1. Your Quiver
I know you’re rolling your eyes right now: “I’d never forget that!” Hang on, though. If your quiver isn’t stashed in your bow case, you could forget it, and that will make for a very long tournament day - or prevent you from competing at all, if you forget the arrows and accessories that are usually in your quiver, too. Make absolutely certain you have a good plan for packing and bringing your quiver with you. 
2. Allen Wrenches
This invaluable little tool set is used for everything from tightening down limb bolts on bows to adjusting the shelf on your finger tab. When something loosens in competition and you need to lock it down quickly, you’ll wish you had these wrenches. Do yourself a favor and order them as a single set with multiple wrenches, rather than three or four individual tools that can easily be lost. 
3. Arrow Lubricant
Ever tried to remove your arrow from a recently re-cored target, only to have your arrow dangerously bend in the process? Make your life easier (and prolong the life of your arrows) by investing in a good arrow lubricant, sold inexpensively at archery stores everywhere. Be sure to use it on your arrows, about 2” from the points, every 3-4 ends of shooting (depending on how dense the target is). 
4. Arrow Puller 
See above, under “terrible things to do to your arrows.” Seriously, yanking your arrows out of a target, even with two hands, is less than ideal without an arrow puller. Not only will your hands become uncomfortable, but you can do major damage to your arrows - and hurt your shoulder or back by pulling improperly. Save yourself some pain and frustration, and remember to pack your arrow puller. 
5. Backup Arrow Rest
Ever had an arrow rest break during competition? It’s the worst feeling, and let’s face it: it’s pretty much impossible to finish your competition without one. But never fear: before your tournament, mark the outline of your rest (or its position) on your riser, and be sure to pack a backup. Bonus points: if it’s an adjustable rest, be sure it’s set exactly the same as your number one. 
6. Bowstring Repair Kit
Bowstrings break. More specifically: servings unravel, nocking points loosen, and it can affect everything from nock height to your ability to shoot. The ultimate bowstring repair kit should include a spare string (for recurve archers), dental floss for nocking point repair, spare nocksets and pliers if you use the brass kind, extra loop material (for compound archers), spare serving thread with a serving tool, and a lighter. 
7. Secondary Release Aid or Finger Tab
As a coach, I’ve seen lots of things break on the archery field, but the top three are definitely bowstrings, arrow rests and release aids/finger tabs. On tabs, we often see spacers loosen up, ledges move, and in extreme weather conditions, leather can become gummy and catch on the string. For release aids, if a mechanism is going to fail or a trigger is going to loosen up, you could have bigger groups in the best case scenario, or punch yourself in the face (worst case scenario). To avoid these unpleasant possibilities, ALWAYS have a secondary tab or release aid that you’ve set up like your primary, that you’ve used in practice and broken in as needed. 
All archers know there are lots of things you can forget that will cause frustration during a tournament, but if you start packing the day before, and use a packing list, you’ll be far less likely to run into this problem. Also, packing the day before and knowing you have what you need sets you up for success, allowing you to get the good night’s sleep you need for a great day of archery.